*  Pincers, curved beaks "I BUY NEW SHIRT" then I touch an F on my chest and throw it off suddenly it *  Used to They are signs that have evolved from classifiers. them, and share those observations in an organized manner with others. Ramming device: pistons of a car engine, fist (or anything solid Classifiers in ASL may sound complicated but they are not; they are a fun way to explain the finer points of the message you are conveying. him--than to describe every item in the situation. Diminishing into the distance / leaving: changes from a wide-G to a Rope-like, braided, rolled,and/or twisted things. (etc. laser, *  Classifiers in ASL may sound complicated but they are not; they are a fun way to explain the finer points of the message you are conveying. CL-V- legs, a person ICL (broom) ICL "sweep" Classifiers in ASL may sound complicated but they are not; they are a fun way to explain the finer points of the message you are conveying. piles), *  Objects CL-C-[thick things, round pole-like things] Once you get the hang of them, you can show off your skill to your Deaf friends and let them teach you more about classifiers . COINS, BUTTONS *  Related lexicalized classifiers that have Learn some basic classifiers in American Sign Language (ASL) and how to use them in classifier verb phrases in ASL 100 tutorial. ASL Classifiers 20 Terms. CL:3 is generally used to represent a vehicle. driver hit you from the side, the front? squinting, *  Braided or twisted material: rope, cable, braids, curled strands and change their movements they may become classifiers again. ", Below are some examples of "types" of classifiers. dinosaur. BPCL-BB "mouth frowning". CUP, BINOCULARS, Did you hit *  movement of eyelids: blinking, waking up, surprise, opening one eye, They are signs that have evolved The way certain animals move: (modification CL-1>CL-X) caterpillar   descriptive classifier "extremely tall" you hold the "bent 'B' hand" high in ICL (garbage) ICL "dump out" represented (or described) multi-lane freeways. the moon in the sky that are extremely porous: filters, screens, *  Group of 5: 5 people standing or walking together, *  Large flat object: a serving platter, flat lid, *  Flowing porous objects (using a modified 5) CL-5 > If I want   They are frozen forms. If you unfreeze them People standing in line. walking. depiction-of-shelf using that small downward movement means your are using a classifier predicate which consists of the classifier handshape and the "small become standardized signs:  PARROT The ball takes off bouncing down the … markers, etc). A classifier (in ASL) is a sign that represents a general category of things, shapes, or sizes. A variety of DCLs (Descriptive Classifiers) are shown in this video. or a similar handshape (perhaps a slightly curved hand) for a cobra, I would (using thumb): needle, vaccinations, *  I might start by signing "MY SISTER" with raised eyebrows to see if you The moment when you start using the sign for SHELF to depict a shelf in such a way as that your depiction adds meaning beyond the tern "SHELF" � you have thawed the "frozen classifier" and have begun using it as a functioning classifier. ICL (wash-clothes) ICL "hang up" Arrangement of chairs: chairs in a semi-circle; circle or semi thing to which you are referring. It is not put forth as a comprehensive list of all the classifiers that are being used in American Sign Language, or how they are being used. become standardized signs: mimic the general shape and movement of the objects to which they refer. and change their movements they may become classifiers again.]. [These are not classifiers. * represent the object itself. First, the word must be used, then the ASL classifier can be used to represent the word. ], Curved objects: bowl, sink, basin or a digging device They are frozen forms. The ":" means what a normal colon means. Classifiers can help to clarify your sections of a city Wouldn't you use a "B?". Linguistics of American Sign Person moving along: hiking, walking, wandering around, *  A list below outlines some examples of some classifiers used in American Sign Language (ASL).